Tag Archives: barrackville

To, Through and Beyond: Fairview

This blog series, ‘To, Through and Beyond,’ has been a quest to discover the validity of Aristotelian philosophy, whether the whole truly is greater than the sum of its parts. The test? We’re taking an in-depth look at the towns, districts, and areas that make up what we know and love: Marion County. The quest, however, is winding down and nearing completion. The end is nigh! But for now, we still have some exploring to do.

Let’s all go to … Fairview!

Before we begin our journey, we’ll need sustenance. Ken’s is a delicious Chinese favorite in the county. It’s somehow specifically located just outside of downtown, right outside of the University District and one country road away from Barrackville (on the way to Fairview). As strange as it is to be located outside of every district, it works out (and especially for us). Grab some take out or eat in before your drive to Barrackville. The drive is a bit country, the food incredible and the portions? Significantly greater than average.

Just after making it into Barrackville, you’ll find the most tranquil of spaces. Wild Acre Farm is a retreat and getaway, spend a few hours or spend a few nights. Embrace meditation as you walk the 80 ft. labyrinth among the hills of Marion. An organic farm full of flowers and goodies, Wild Acres also operates as a retreat space and serves the produce from the farm.

 

red covered bridge
Barrackville Covered Bridge

 

While you’re in Barrackville, take a tour of a beautiful history lesson. The Barrackville Covered Bridge was built for $1,852 (how extravagant!) and was used for over 130 years. It’s on the National Register of Historic Places for reasons other than its advanced age. The only hostile army ever in Marion County crossed this bridge with intent to destroy it. At the persuasion of nearby mill owners (how adorable!), Confederate General William E. “Grumble” Jones spared it (how nice!). After its existence as the only bridge in operation without the use of modern reinforcement (how terrifying!), it was fully restored in 1999 and has been bypassed with a modern road and bridge. (And we all heave a collective sigh of relief.)

The current Barrackville Covered Bridge is, as stated, completely restored. Although it looks old-fashioned, it is structurally sound for taking an adorable stroll, making sweet memories and sharing cute pictures on Insta.

If you happen to be in town in December, enjoy Barrackville’s Christmas in Our Town, an all-day celebration of the holidays. After the craft fair, take a horse-drawn carriage ride through town. End the day with a good ol’ fashioned parade and (in the traditional Colombian way … random) with fireworks!

Now, it’s time for some good cooking – and eating. Fairview Diner has everything your mama used to make for you. Enjoy chicken pot pie, potato soup or vegetable soup and move onto country fried steak with mashed potatoes. Enjoy a cabbage roll and slaw before dessert. Berry cobbler, turtle pie, spice cake are a few among many other pies and sweet delicacies.

Featuring hot dogs, Colasessano’s pepperoni buns and pizza, nachos, and salads a stop in Hometown Hotdogs of Fairview is a requirement. Check out their assorted seasoned fries (if you’re brave, try the Fire Fries). Named 2015 Best “Working Dog” (re-heated hot dog) in Marion County.

 

Fairview July 4th Celebration
Fairview July 4th Celebration

 

Good thing you got some practice in at Hometown Hotdogs. Fairview Fourth of July celebrates the occasion in every way imaginable! Participate in or watch the delicious fun of the hotdog eating contest; listen to or play in the acoustic jam session; and run the 5k Fun Run or cheer the athletes on! It wouldn’t be an Independence Day Celebration without a grand parade (and Uncle Sam), a cake walk, live music, magic, and fireworks.

Last but not least is a quintessential summer stop. Little Dippers has 24 flavors of ice cream, a case full of baked and frozen goods plus savory meals! Choose between peach and blackberry cobbler; pick from banana, caramel, and red velvet poke cakes. And that’s just dessert! Will you have a cheeseburger hoagie, a cod sandwich, or a bratwurst dog with sauerkraut? For the side? Cornbread, chicken, and dumpling soup and/or Oliverio Pepper Soup! The options are endless, but our stomachs are not. Choose wisely.

So that you are in the know, Fielding H. Yost is one of Fairview’s most notable home-town boys.  Fielding was a football player, coach, and college athletics administrator.   In addition, Yost was also a successful business person, lawyer, and author; but he is best known as a leading figure in pioneering the development of college football into a national phenomenon.

As you can see, Barrackville and Fairview don’t mess around when it comes to history, food, and fun. So enjoy the festivities, enjoy the hotdogs and enjoy Marion!

What’s your favorite Fairview memory? 

 

A couple from Canada traveling to North Carolina stopped by the Visitor Center this morning to get directions to the Barrackville Covered Bridge. Looks like the word is out! #famous #coveredbridge #GoToWV #mymarionwv #WV #wvhistory #Barrackville

A couple from Canada traveling to North Carolina stopped by the Visitor Center this morning to get directions to the Barrackville Covered Bridge. Looks like the word is out! #famous #coveredbridge #GoToWV #mymarionwv #WV #wvhistory #Barrackville

Posted to Instagram by the Marion County CVB/.

Celebrate Marion County’s Most Unique Holiday Events

The holiday season can get quite hectic to say the least. But here are some unique events you will want to make time for!

 

cooking school
Festival Cucina cooking school during the Feast of the Seven Fishes Festival

 

Celebrate Christmas Italian-style at the Feast of the 7 Fishes festival, which dishes out hearty servings of authentic cuisine, music and art December 10th in downtown Fairmont. In addition, our local Italian chefs will even share their secret family recipes at Festival Cucina cooking school the evening beforehand!

Discover for yourself why the Southeast Tourism Society named the Festival at Top 20 Event for December.

 

coal mine equipment
Coal Mine Appreication Day & Swap Meet

 

The 4th Annual Coal Miners Appreciation Day Swap Meet is your chance to browse historic artifacts, chat with collectors and take home some West Virginia heritage.

 

costumed interrupter at Pricketts Fort
Pricketts Fort 18th C Christmas Tour

 

Holidays through history

Escape to a time before frantic shopping at the 18th-Century Christmas Tour at Pricketts Fort. Discover how they used to celebrate the season on the wild frontier. Or, learn to create Christmas ornaments, needle felt or handmade wreaths at artisan workshops at the fort.

For more old-time holiday fun, explore all 3 floors of the elegant 1901 Fleming Mansion during Tea with a Twist. Or, boost your spirits with decorative wreaths and hot cider at the  Greenery Bazaar.

 

Ryan Cain and The Ables band
Ryan Cain and The Ables Rockin’ Christmas Show

 

Christmas classics, and then some

Ice skating… without ice?!? Palatine Park opens its synthetic rink Dec. 10. Everything is free, including rentals! Follow your skate with a night of magic at the Celebration of Lights, with 1.3 miles of glittering lights and displays. Enjoy a grand parade, craft fair and fireworks at Barrackville’s Christmas in Our Town.

Dickens’ gets a melodic makeover in “Scrooge: A Christmas Carol,” and Fairmont State University shares classic pieces, jazz and African drums for Fete de Noel. First Presbyterian Church combines scripture readings with classics all of us love at Lessons and Carols.

A little more spunk? Ryan Cain and The Ables’ Rockin’ Christmas Show is a rockabilly treat. But if you prefer country, Sagebrush Round-Up delivers a closing kick to 2016 with Ring in the New Year. Frolfers can tee off to a background of 200+ merry lights displays at the Disc Golf Holiday Glow Bowl II.

Which of these Marion County events will you be adding to your December calendar? 

Marching Along Marion County’s Historical Past

If you listen closely, you can almost hear the faint beat of a Civil War snare drum echoing across the rolling hills of Marion County.

At first glance, it might be hard to imagine that our neighborhood was once a part of an era that redefined us as a nation, but if you explore Fairmont and its surrounding communities, you will soon feel a historical presence that is still alive today.

Many times we get caught up in the big picture of our past, forgetting about the richness within the smaller details of historical events.

Walk along the same paths and roads that Union and Confederate soldiers once traveled. Take a self-guided tour of the 6 Marion County Civil War markers (maps available at the Visitor Center).

 

Downtown Fairmont
Downtown Fairmont

Attack on Fairmont (foot of the former Low Level Bridge -Madison Street) – On April 29, 1863, Confederate troops under General William Jones captured the town of Fairmont  and destroy the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad bridge upstream at present-day 12th Street. You can still see some of the bullet-pocked bridge piers on the (Monongahela River) riverbanks.

 

 

 

 

Aretas Brooks Fleming, 8th Governor of West Virginia
Aretas Brooks Fleming, 8th Governor of West Virginia

 

The home of A. B. Fleming (207 Jefferson Street) – Aretas Brooks Fleming was the 8th Governor of West Virginia. During the war, he was the Marion County prosecuting attorney and served in the Fairmont Home Guard. The marker is located on the grounds of the former American Legion Home.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The suspension Bridge spanned the Mon River between Fairmont and Palatine
The suspension Bridge spanned the Mon River between Fairmont and Palatine

 

Battle for the Bridge (Palatine Park) –  At the site of the Palatine foundry, a battle of the suspension bridge took place on April 29, 1863. The bridge spanned the Monongahela River between Fairmont and Palatine.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Beverly -Fairmont Turnpike (100 Kirk Street) – The Beverly-Fairmont Turnpike was completed in 1852, and gave access to the new railroad, which had reached Grafton that same year. Beverly continued to be the county’s center of commerce until the 1890’s. 

 

 

 

Francis and Julia Pierpont re-enactors
Francis and Julia Pierpont re-enactors

Francis H. Pierpont Home (500 Quincy Street) – Governor of the Restored Government of Virginia brought his bride, Julia Augusta Robertson Pierpont here in 1854. Pierpont devised plans that restored loyal Virginia to the Union and gave life to West Virginia. Julia is credited for honoring soldiers from both sides of the war on Decoration Day. Now known as Memorial Day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Woodlawn Cemetery
Woodlawn Cemetery

Woodlawn Cemetery (335 Maple Avenue) –  Boaz Fleming, the founder of Fairmont, is here with his wife, Elizabeth. Another descendant is Aretas B. Fleming, eighth governor of West Virginia and a founder of Fairmont. James Otis Watson is considered the father of the bituminous coal industry in north central West Virginia. He and Pierpont owned the first coal mine to be commercially viable following the completion of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad linking Fairmont with the eastern seaboard markets. One of his daughters married Aretas B. Fleming. His sons, James Edwin Watson, Sylvanus Lamb Watson and Clarence Wayland Watson are also buried here. Matthew Mansfield Neely, a governor, a congressman and a national senator is also buried in the cemetery. 

 

 

 

 

Barrackville Covered Bridge
Barrackville Covered Bridge

Although not part of the Civil War Marker Trail, the Barrackville Covered Bridge (off U.S. Route 250 N, County Route 21 at the junction of 250/32) – was saved from destruction during the Jones-Imboden Raid (preliminary to the Battle of Fairmont). During the raid, the Ice Family, nearby mill owners and Confederate sympathizers convinced General William ‘Grumble’ Jones to save the bridge. The bridge was originally built in 1853 by Eli and Lemuel Chenoweth.

 

Which of these Marion County historic sites have you visited?

If you’re in the neighborhood, stop by the Visitor Center and check out this replica of the Barrackville Covered Bridge. Handcrafted by Hubert Grubb, Jr. in 1998. Scale 1/2″ = 1′ #barrackville #WV #coveredbridge #bridge #civilwar

If you’re in the neighborhood, stop by the Visitor Center and check out this replica of the Barrackville Covered Bridge. Handcrafted by Hubert Grubb, Jr. in 1998. Scale 1/2″ = 1′ #barrackville #WV #coveredbridge #bridge #civilwar

Posted to Instagram by the Marion County CVB/.

Today Matt Tharp dropped off some cool post cards of Barrackville, WV in the early 1900’s. He gave us plenty to share so stop by the Visitor Center next week and pick up a few. Thanks, Matt! #barrackville #wv #postcard

Today Matt Tharp dropped off some cool post cards of Barrackville, WV in the early 1900’s. He gave us plenty to share so stop by the Visitor Center next week and pick up a few. Thanks, Matt! #barrackville #wv #postcard

Posted to Instagram by the Marion County CVB/.